Paranoid Android

"Love is the movement. Art is the aftermath. Passion is the pull. Obsession is the push." _NMA_ My interests in a nutshell: Comics. Film. Hats. Music. Art. Photography. Laughter. Literature. Games. Fashion and Style. Its all an Eclectic Mix. Shall we take a look? _ 21 Year old New Yorker. Fine Arts/Fashion Design Major.


Myrtle Snow.
timmywestside:

slightlyidentical

(Source: hellyeahrihannafenty, via hacott)

yalestewart:

Bruce and Selina commission
Pencil and ink on bristol, 9”x12”
Colors in PS CC
-Yale

yalestewart:

Bruce and Selina commission

Pencil and ink on bristol, 9”x12”

Colors in PS CC

-Yale

(via dcu)

The French have all kinds of worthwhile ideas on larger matters. This occurred to me recently when I was strolling through my museum-like neighborhood in central Paris, and realized there were — I kid you not — seven bookstores within a 10-minute walk of my apartment. Granted, I live in a bookish area. But still: Do the French know something about the book business that we Americans don’t?

[…]

France … has just unanimously passed a so-called anti-Amazon law, which says online sellers can’t offer free shipping on discounted books. (“It will be either cheese or dessert, not both at once,” a French commentator explained.) The new measure is part of France’s effort to promote “biblio-diversity” and help independent bookstores compete.

[…]

The French secret is deeply un-American: fixed book prices. Its 1981 “Lang law,” named after former Culture Minister Jack Lang, says that no seller can offer more than 5 percent off the cover price of new books. That means a book costs more or less the same wherever you buy it in France, even online. The Lang law was designed to make sure France continues to have lots of different books, publishers and booksellers.

[…]

What underlies France’s book laws isn’t just an economic position — it’s also a worldview. Quite simply, the French treat books as special. Some 70 percent of French people said they read at least one book last year; the average among French readers was 15 books. Readers say they trust books far more than any other medium, including newspapers and TV. The French government classifies books as an “essential good,” along with electricity, bread and water.

—   

Amidst America’s Amazon-drama, NYT’s Pamela Druckerman reflects on what the book world can learn from the French.

Still, one has to wonder whether the solution to one monopoly (the commercial) can ever be another (the governmental), and whether that’s truly in the public interest – the “public,” of course, being first and foremost readers themselves. There’s something hypocritical about the proposition that the books are an “essential good” on par with electricity – what government would ever price-fix electricity and deny its citizen the most affordable electricity possible?

(via explore-blog)

“There is no final, satisfying way to balance our need to be known with our need to be alone.”

—   

So much wisdom in Joshua Rothman's beautiful essay on Virginia Woolf’s idea of privacy.

Pair with legendary psychoanalyst Adam Phillips on developing our capacity for “fertile solitude.” 

(via explore-blog)
paperbeatsscissors:

Toadstool Train

paperbeatsscissors:

Toadstool Train

davykesey:

We really didn’t have enough money, enough people, or enough time for our road trip. I almost called it off when I originally started planning it. But there will never be a good time to travel the country for four weeks, just like there will never be a good time to quit your job, read that book, or join a gym. You will probably never have enough money, time, connections, willpower, whatever—to feel ready to make a dream happen. And this is the lesson I learned: eventually you have to stop giving yourself excuses and make the jump. 

(via crisostomo922)

explore-blog:

For Hunter S. Thompson's birthday, the always-wonderful Paper and Salt cooks up his birthday breakfast:

4 slices bacon4 corn tortillas1 (14- to 15-ounce) can whole tomatoes in juice1/4 cup chopped white onion1/8 cup chopped fresh cilantro plus additional for sprinkling1 tablespoon chopped canned chipotle chiles in adobo1 garlic clove, coarsely chopped1/2 teaspoon salt4 large eggssliced avocado, for garnishcotija cheese, for garnish

See the full recipe, with background, here. Then complement with the brilliant Fictitious Dishes and some treats from The Artists’ & Writers’ Cookbook.

explore-blog:

For Hunter S. Thompson's birthday, the always-wonderful Paper and Salt cooks up his birthday breakfast:

4 slices bacon
4 corn tortillas
1 (14- to 15-ounce) can whole tomatoes in juice
1/4 cup chopped white onion
1/8 cup chopped fresh cilantro plus additional for sprinkling
1 tablespoon chopped canned chipotle chiles in adobo
1 garlic clove, coarsely chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 large eggs
sliced avocado, for garnish
cotija cheese, for garnish

See the full recipe, with background, here. Then complement with the brilliant Fictitious Dishes and some treats from The Artists’ & Writers’ Cookbook.

fallontonight:

John Lithgow has a lot to say about his beard.

Omg! He’s playing King Learn in Shakespeare in the park. I must goooooooooo!!!!!